Assessment Portfolio 3: Authentic Assessment

Microcredential Plan

A sample image of various digial badges.

Image Source: http://www.worlds-of-learning-nmhs.com/2016/05/08/the-growing-potential-of-micro-credentials/

Microcredentialing has always resonated with me. Growing up in the 80’s and 90’s I was exposed to the beginning of the electronic gaming universe. While I only ever dabbled in gaming, the concept of achievements always struck me as a powerful tool for education. With the development of microcredentialing systems, this tool has the possibility of becoming a powerful learning tool.

Learner Outcome 1. Explain how the Law of Definite Proportion (which deals with mass ratios) implies atom ratios.

In this learning module, the students will have readings, micro-lectures to watch, and video demonstrations to watch. Once all the material has been viewed, the students must perform the following activity.

Assessment (from: Assessment Portfolio 2: Formative Assessments)

Student Task: The Law of Definite Proportions was developed in a time before chemists understood that atoms are the building block of all matter. It was discovered that the ratio of the masses of each of the elements in a compound is the same regardless of where the compounds is sampled. For example, no matter where you get a sample of water, when you determine the masses of the hydrogen and oxygen in water you always the ratio of 8 grams of oxygen for every 1 gram of hydrogen, an 8:1 ratio. What does having a fixed mass ratio suggest about the properties of atoms? Compose a single tweet using Twitter to answer this question. Use the hashtag #GenChemDefinite in your post. Keep up with all of your classmates posts and reply to at least two of them.

Grading Rubric

Tilting test tube in an orange circle.

Image Source: https://www.iconfinder.com/icons/311847/chemistry_circle_learn_school_study_subject_icon

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Dr. Karen Franker that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 30/45 on the following rubric. Upon successful completion of this outcome, students will receive a “Definite Law” badge shown at right. Each student will have three attempts to successfully complete this outcome. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their first attempt, they will receive a gold version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their second attempt, they will receive a silver version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their third attempt, they will receive a bronze version of this badge.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Content Tweets provide trivial ideas that do not add to the discussion. Tweets provide suitable ideas that add to the discussion. Tweets provide meaningful ideas that add to the discussion. Tweets provide comprehensive and insightful ideas that add to the discussion.
Frequency Fails to meet the required number of tweets. Falls one tweet short of the required number of tweets. Meets the required number of tweets. Exceeds the required number of tweets.
Comments Reply tweets provide trivial ideas that do not further expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide suitable ideas that expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide meaningful ideas that expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide comprehensive and insightful ideas that expand upon the original.

Learner Outcome 2. Compare the Law of Definite Proportion to the Law of Multiple Proportions paying close attention what they imply about the atom.

In this learning module, the students will have readings, micro-lectures to watch, and video demonstrations to watch. Once all the material has been viewed, the students must perform the following activity.

Assessment (from: Assessment Portfolio 2: Formative Assessments)

Student Task: In the 1700’s and early 1800’s there were many discoveries that led up to Dalton’s Atomic Theory. It was through improvements upon Dalton’s Atomic Theory that scientists were able to develop our modern understanding of the atom. Two laws that were instrumental in the development of Dalton’s Atomic Theory are the Law of Definite Proportions and the Law of Multiple Proportions. While both laws were instrumental in the development of Dalton’s Atomic Theory, both seem, on the face of it, remarkably similar. Compare these laws by answering the following questions using VoiceThread:

  1. In what ways are these laws similar?
  2. In what ways are these laws different?
  3. When we look at the concept of the atom, what does each of these laws explain about the existence and properties of atoms?

Once you have completed your post, please comment on the posts of two of your fellow students. Pay particular attention to your fellow student’s answers to question 3. Did they miss anything?

Grading Rubric

Flask in an orange circle.

Image Source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/484488872389506890/

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Joan Vandervelde that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 20/30 on the following rubric. Upon successful completion of this outcome, students will receive a “Definite vs Multiple” badge shown at left. Each student will have three attempts to successfully complete this outcome. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their first attempt, they will receive a gold version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their second attempt, they will receive a silver version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their third attempt, they will receive a bronze version of this badge.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Content Posts show superficial and undeveloped understanding of the material. Posts show suitable though cursory understanding of the material. Posts show meaningful and substantial understanding of the material. Posts show insightful and extensive understanding of the material.
Participation Posts do not contribute to the conversation. Posts sometimes contribute to the conversation. Posts contribute to the conversation. Posts enhance and drive the conversation.

Learner Outcome 3. Describe how the Law of Definite Proportion, Law of Multiple Proportions, and Avogadro’s Hypothesis were melded into Dalton’s Atomic Theory.

In this learning module, the students will have readings, micro-lectures to watch, and video demonstrations to watch. Once all the material has been viewed, the students must perform the following activity.

Assessment (from: Assessment Portfolio 2: Formative Assessments)

Student Task: John Dalton developed one of the first theories that concerned chemistry. His Atomic Theory has formed a foundation that allowed us to make all of our groundbreaking discoveries dealing with what our world is made up of and why it works. John Dalton didn’t work in a vacuum, however. He based his Atomic Theory on laws that were developed by his contemporaries. Create a VoiceThread post which answers the following questions:

  1. What did John Dalton learn from the Law of Definite Proportion?
  2. What did John Dalton learn from the Law of Multiple Proportions?
  3. What did John Dalton learn from Avogadro’s Hypothesis?

When you create your response, pay particular attention to how the existence of atoms as the fundamental building block of matter results in these laws. Once you have completed your post, please comment on the posts of two of your fellow students.

Grading Rubric

Pouring a liquid from a test tube into a flask.

Image Source: https://www.iconfinder.com/icons/350726/analysis_chemical_chemistry_lab_laboratory_pharmacy_test_tube_icon

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Joan Vandervelde that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 20/30 on the following rubric. Upon successful completion of this outcome, students will receive a “Knowing Dalton” badge shown at right. Each student will have three attempts to successfully complete this outcome. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their first attempt, they will receive a gold version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their second attempt, they will receive a silver version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their third attempt, they will receive a bronze version of this badge.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Content Posts show superficial and undeveloped understanding of the material. Posts show suitable though cursory understanding of the material. Posts show meaningful and substantial understanding of the material. Posts show insightful and extensive understanding of the material.
Participation Posts do not contribute to the conversation. Posts sometimes contribute to the conversation. Posts contribute to the conversation. Posts enhance and drive the conversation.

Learner Outcome 4. Rewrite Dalton’s Atomic Theory to accurately account for our modern understanding of the properties of atoms.

In this learning module, the students will have readings, micro-lectures to watch, and video demonstrations to watch. Once all the material has been viewed, the students must perform the following activity.

Assessment (from: Assessment Portfolio 2: Formative Assessments)

Student Task: John Dalton developed his atomic theory based on the scientific discoveries of the time (Law of Definite Proportions, Law of Multiple Proportions, etc.). Since the time of Dalton, our understanding of the submicroscopic world has greatly increased. In groups of 2-3, use your knowledge of atoms and their properties to create your own atomic theory. Your theory should have the same “structure” as Dalton’s Atomic Theory but should be based in our modern understanding of the atom. Once you have constructed your atomic theory, use easel.ly to create an infographic that describes your atomic theory and emphasizes its key characteristics.

Grading Rubric

A flask with a model of the atom inside.

Image Source: https://iconscout.com/icon/chemistry-35

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Dr. Karen Franker that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 30/45 on the following rubric. Upon successful completion of this outcome, students will receive a “A Better Atom” badge shown at left. Each student will have three attempts to successfully complete this outcome. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their first attempt, they will receive a gold version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their second attempt, they will receive a silver version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their third attempt, they will receive a bronze version of this badge.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Arrangement Concepts are disorganized and hard to follow. Concepts are arranged methodically though simplistically. Concepts are are arranged systematically. Concepts are arranged purposefully and skillfully.
Graphics Graphics are irrelevant to the concepts. Graphics are appropriate to the concepts. Graphics are relevant and effective towards understanding the concepts. Graphics are insightful towards understanding and expanding on the concepts.
Content Content shows trivial understanding of the topic. Content shows a basic understanding of the topic. Content shows a meaningful understanding of the topic. Content shows an insightful understanding of the topic.

Learner Outcome 5. List the basic chemical and physical properties of ionic and covalent compounds.

In this learning module, the students will have readings, micro-lectures to watch, and video demonstrations to watch. Once all the material has been viewed, the students must perform the following activity.

Assessment (from: Assessment Portfolio 2: Formative Assessments)

Student Task: Ionic and covalent compounds have different chemical and physical properties. For this assignment you will need to compose four tweets using Twitter:

  1. What is a physical property of ionic compounds? Use the hashtag #GenChemIonicPhys for this post.
  2. What is a chemical property of ionic compounds? Use the hashtag #GenChemIonicChem for this post.
  3. What is a physical properties of covalent compounds? Use the hashtag #GenChemCovalentPhys for this post.
  4. What is a physical properties of covalent compounds? Use the hashtag #GenChemCovalentChem for this post.

Once you have completed your tweets, view all the tweets that your fellow classmates have composed and reply to at least one student per hashtag. Pay particular attention to the following question: Is the property described a general property of this class of compounds (ionic/covalent) or is it specific to a subset of a class of compounds?

Grading Rubric

Complex flask with two necks. Gas is escaping through the top.

Image Source: https://www.iconfinder.com/icons/358474/chemistry_experiment_lab_laboratory_research_science_tube_icon

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Dr. Karen Franker that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 30/45 on the following rubric. Upon successful completion of this outcome, students will receive a “Compound Properties” badge shown at right. Each student will have three attempts to successfully complete this outcome. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their first attempt, they will receive a gold version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their second attempt, they will receive a silver version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their third attempt, they will receive a bronze version of this badge.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Content Tweets provide trivial ideas that do not add to the discussion. Tweets provide suitable ideas that add to the discussion. Tweets provide meaningful ideas that add to the discussion. Tweets provide comprehensive and insightful ideas that add to the discussion.
Frequency Fails to meet the required number of tweets. Falls one tweet short of the required number of tweets. Meets the required number of tweets. Exceeds the required number of tweets.
Comments Reply tweets provide trivial ideas that do not further expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide suitable ideas that expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide meaningful ideas that expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide comprehensive and insightful ideas that expand upon the original.

Learner Outcome 6. Compare the chemical properties of ionic compounds with covalent compounds.

In this learning module, the students will have readings, micro-lectures to watch, and video demonstrations to watch. Once all the material has been viewed, the students must perform the following activity.

Assessment (from: Assessment Portfolio 2: Formative Assessments)

Student Task: It is important to understand the physical and chemical similarities and differences between ionic compounds and covalent (molecular) compounds. Often, knowing these similarities and differences can allow us to better utilize the chemicals found in the world around us. In groups of 2-3, determine the general physical and chemical characteristics of ionic and covalent compounds. Pay particular attention to noting similarities between the two as well as the dramatic differences between them. With these similarities and differences in hand, your group will use easel.ly to construct an infographic that will visually illustrate to its viewers the similarities and differences that you found. Your infographic must include at least 5 characteristics.

Grading Rubric

 

A flask with foam coming out of the top.

Image Source: https://www.iconfinder.com/icons/309148/bomex_flask_chemistry_experiment_flask_lab_science_test_icon

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Dr. Karen Franker that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 30/45 on the following rubric. Upon successful completion of this outcome, students will receive a “Ionic vs Covalent” badge shown at left. Each student will have three attempts to successfully complete this outcome. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their first attempt, they will receive a gold version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their second attempt, they will receive a silver version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their third attempt, they will receive a bronze version of this badge.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Arrangement Concepts are disorganized and hard to follow. Concepts are arranged methodically though simplistically. Concepts are are arranged systematically. Concepts are arranged purposefully and skillfully.
Graphics Graphics are irrelevant to the concepts. Graphics are appropriate to the concepts. Graphics are relevant and effective towards understanding the concepts. Graphics are insightful towards understanding and expanding on the concepts.
Content Content shows trivial understanding of the topic. Content shows a basic understanding of the topic. Content shows a meaningful understanding of the topic. Content shows an insightful understanding of the topic.

Learner Outcome 7. Plan a series of chemical tests that would allow you to distinguish ionic compounds from covalent compounds.

In this learning module, the students will have readings, micro-lectures to watch, and video demonstrations to watch. Once all the material has been viewed, the students must perform the following activities. This outcome is slightly more important in the process of becoming a chemist than other outcomes. Much of chemistry, beyond general chemistry, involves planning tests and experiments. Due to the importance of this outcomes, the students must successfully complete the following two assessments.

Assessment

Student Task: The kitchen is the most common place where we all experience chemicals in our lives. From salt to sugar to baking soda, many things that we find in our kitchen cabinets are chemicals. Go into your kitchen and find 4 different chemicals. Describe these 4 chemicals in a tweet using the hashtag #KitchenChemicals. Think of ways of telling them apart using only what you find in your kitchen. Tweet at least 2 methods of telling them apart using the hastag #KitchenChemistry.

Use Twitter to follow the tweets in these two hashtags and reply to your fellow classmates providing them with constructive helpful feedback. Are their choices of chemicals good? Is there a way of improving their method of distinguishing chemicals? Etc.

Grading Rubric

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Dr. Karen Franker that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 30/45 on the following rubric.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Content Tweets provide trivial ideas that do not add to the discussion. Tweets provide suitable ideas that add to the discussion. Tweets provide meaningful ideas that add to the discussion. Tweets provide comprehensive and insightful ideas that add to the discussion.
Frequency Fails to meet the required number of tweets. Falls one tweet short of the required number of tweets. Meets the required number of tweets. Exceeds the required number of tweets.
Comments Reply tweets provide trivial ideas that do not further expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide suitable ideas that expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide meaningful ideas that expand upon the original. Reply tweets provide comprehensive and insightful ideas that expand upon the original.

Assessment (from: Assessment Portfolio 2: Formative Assessments)

Student Task: Chemists are often tasked with identifying and classifying unknown chemicals. One of the first tasks that needs to be considered is determining if the compound is ionic or covalent. Using your knowledge of the properties of ionic and covalent compounds, plan a series of chemical tests that you would use in order to identify whether an unknown compound is ionic or covalent. Your plan must include at least 4 chemical/physical tests. In groups of 2-3 create an infographic using easel.ly to lay out the plan listing the different tests that you would perform as well as explaining what information you get from each test and how that would help in the determination.

Grading Rubric

This grading rubric has been based off the rubric provided by Dr. Karen Franker that has been posted here and on the AAC Rubric Wordsmith document. Successful completion of this assessment will be a score of at least 30/45 on the following rubric.

Element Unsatisfactory
(0 pts.)
Adequate
(5 pts.)
Proficient
(10 pts.)
Exemplary
(15 pts.)
Arrangement Concepts are disorganized and hard to follow. Concepts are arranged methodically though simplistically. Concepts are are arranged systematically. Concepts are arranged purposefully and skillfully.
Graphics Graphics are irrelevant to the concepts. Graphics are appropriate to the concepts. Graphics are relevant and effective towards understanding the concepts. Graphics are insightful towards understanding and expanding on the concepts.
Content Content shows trivial understanding of the topic. Content shows a basic understanding of the topic. Content shows a meaningful understanding of the topic. Content shows an insightful understanding of the topic.

Completion

Upon successful completion of both of the assessments in this outcome, students will receive a “Testing Master” badge shown at below. Each student will have three attempts to successfully complete this outcome. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their first attempt, they will receive a gold version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their second attempt, they will receive a silver version of this badge. If the student successfully completes this outcome on their third attempt, they will receive a bronze version of this badge.

A test tube, a flask, and a beaker. A tube connects the flask and the beaker.

Image Source: http://www.flaticon.com/free-icon/chemistry_201607

Super Badge

When a student has collected each of the above 7 badges they will earn the “Understanding Atoms and Molecules” badge that is shown below.

Three flask: one with green liquid, one with pink liquid, and one with blue liquid. Each liquid is bubbling.

Image Source: https://www.iconfinder.com/icons/60738/chemistry_lab_research_test_tubes_vials_icon

Video Tour of Microcredentialing Plan

Below is a video tour of this microcredentialing plan.

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